Orange TV Anime Announced!

[Versão em português disponível no fim da publicação]


Not so long time ago I wrote a review about the manga Orange and the upcoming live-action movie. Now, Ichigo Takano‘s masterpiece is coming to Japanese televisions this summer (and hopefully Crunchyroll is going to stream it overseas).

Produced by TMS Entertainment and Telecom Animation Film, the anime series is going to be directed by Hiroshi Hamasaki (Gate, TerraFormars) and Nobuteru Yuki (Escaflowne) as character designer.

Crunchyroll Manga describes the series:

‘What can I do now to prevent a future without Kakeru?’ In the spring of my second year of high school, I received a letter from “myself”, ten years in the future. It urged the 16-year-old me to take action so I wouldn’t have the same regrets…”

Futabasha‘s Monthly Action magazine is also going to publish a one-shot special edition of the series on next April’s issue.

Orange Anime

Orange Anime first promo poster

In Brazil, the manga is currently being officially published by JBC.

If you haven’t read this wonderful manga yet, hurry up there’s still time!


[Portuguese translation below]

A não muito tempo atras, publiquei uma review (em inglês) sobre o mangá Orange e o filme live-action a ser lançado nos cinemas japoneses. E a grande noticia é que neste verão, a obra-prima de Ichigo Takano fará sua estréia também em Anime nas TVs nipônicas (e vamos torcer para que o Crunchyroll “streame” por aqui também).

Produzido pelas gigantes TMS Entertainment e Telecom Animation Film, a série de anime terá direção de Hiroshi Hamasaki (o mesmo de Gate e TerraFormars) e Nobuteru Yuki (The Vision of Escaflowne) como character designer.

Descrição via Crunchyroll Manga (tradução livre):
‘O que eu poderia fazer agora para impedir um futuro sem o Kakeru?’ Na primavera do meu segundo ano do colégio, eu recebi uma carta de mim mesma dez anos no futuro. Ela pedia que eu, então com 16 anos, tomasse medidas para que eu não tivesse os mesmos arrependimentos.”

A revista Monthly Action da editora Futabasha também publicará uma edição especial one-shot do manga em Abril deste ano.

Orange Anime

Primeiro poster da série animada de Orange

Vale lembrar que o mangá já está em publicação oficial no Brasil pela editora JBC. E se você ainda não leu este magnifico trabalho, corra que ainda dá tempo!


 

 

9 Christmas/New Year unusual traditions you find in Brazil

There are many Christmas/New Year traditions around the world. Some are quite conventional and some are completely different.

Despite being officially a secular state, the most prevalent religion in Brazil is Catholicism – because of this you can see many references to Catholic saints and other holy characters in Christmas decorations around here. On the other hand, during the New Year celebrations there are more references to African rooted religions such as the Yoruba, where many Brazilians perform good luck rituals to have a more prosperous year. And there are even some traditions that aren’t attached to any sort of spiritual meaning, but have been going on for so long that now it’s impossible to dissociate them. And because Brazil is a very interbred country, many of those traditions are inherited from somewhere else but Brazilian people have certainly added their own personal touch to them.

Take a peek at some of the most curious Christmas/New year traditions you’d commonly witness in Brazil during the festivities:

1 – Panettone

You know Christmas is coming in Brazil when you start seeing Panettones for sale just about everywhere – From the convenience stores to the more exquisite shops.

Originally from Italy, traditional Panettone is a type of sweet bread loaf with mixed comfits fruits. Yet there are many other variations like chocolate chips and chocolate mousse stuffed. No Christmas party is complete without at least 1 type of Panettone!

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Comfit fruits Panettone: The more traditional one and my favourite (my sister bought this one for me) ;P

2 – Raisins, raisins everywhere… And comfit fruits:

During the end of the year celebrations in Brazil you can find Raisins and Comfit Fruits not only in the Panettones but almost everywhere, as many other traditional dishes use them in their recipes.

vaiteruvapassa

The christmas promotional stickers from the gift brand “Imaginarium” being for and against raisins. It says “Don’t put raisins anywhere” and “Yes, there shall be raisins”.

Some people are so tired of finding raisins in everything (specially in rice) that went as far as creating Internet Memes begging for it to stop.

I personally like them. 😀

3 – Chester:

As in several other places in the world, Roasted Turkey is usually the main course on Christmas feasts in Brazil. However, there’s a specific kind of Chicken that has gained a lot of popularity over the years because of the more affordable price: The Chester.

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Perdigão’s Chester (Image Source: Revista BRF)

Presented (and trademarked) in 1982 by a large meat company called “Perdigão“,  Chesters are artificially selected chickens with larger breasts and thighs and a more tender meat.

(Since I’m vegetarian, I’m totally out of this one though)

4 – Lentils, Nuts, Hazelnuts, Walnuts and Dates:

There’s a (originally Italian) superstition that says if you eat a tablespoon of lentils during the turn of the year you are going to have an abundant table for the rest of the new year to come.

LentilhaSorte-sheila

Lucky Lentils (Image Source: Nestlé.com.br)

Many sorts of nuts are an Arabian tradition that brings wealth to those who eat them.

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Nut to bring you wealth (Image Source: Internet Archives)

5 – Grapes:

Eating 3 or 7 (or whatever your lucky number is) grapes at the New Year’s Midnight will bring you prosperity, lucky and plenty of food. It was an inherited tradition from Portugal.

grapes

Grapes (Image Source: Greenmarketglobal.com)

6 – Specific colored (or new) underwear:

Yes, you read it right. It’s said that if you wear new underwear in the New Year’s eve it’ll bring you lucky in your love life. And another belief probably derived from African religions, says if you wear white underwear on the same occasion it’ll bring you peace, purity and harmony.

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Pick your fortune! (Image Source: lighthouse8.com)

There are some variations of this superstition, extending the new clothes to your whole outfit during both Christmas and New Year. Also, if you wear outfits in specific colors during the turn of the new year you’ll achieve different goals. The more commons (besides the white for peace and harmony) are yellow for money, red for passion, pink for love, green for hope and health, and blue for serenity.

7 – Coarse Salt, Champagne and jumping:

During the New Year celebrations, washing your belonging with coarse salt or sea water will keep all negative energies away. 

Jumping three times while holding a champagne glass without spitting a single drop will also achieve the same goal. But if you get soaked in champagne by others it is considered good fortune for you. Jumping over 7 waves on the beach is also said to bring you good fortune.

8 – Leave offerings for the goddess “Iemanjá” at the sea/river:

It’s a ritual that also comes from the African religions. Leaving an offering for the goddess on New Year’s eve is supposed to help you to meet the most diversified goals in the year to come. The offerings may vary according to your specific goals but they are usually roses and flowers.

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Brazilian TV presenter Luciano Huck delivering his offering (Image Source: ofuxico.com.br)

9 – Popular TV Shows:

On Brazilian open Television Channels (like Globo) some Christmas/New Year special shows have been happening for so many decades that they also became sort of a tradition. Like Roberto Carlos’ end of the year specials.

Roberto Carlos is a very famous pop-singer that has been presenting an end of the year special show for more than twenty years by now. He’s the favorite of most grandmas in Brazil. Many other Brazilian artists also host their special shows during holidays, like Xuxa (famous as TV for children presenter) and Luciano Huck (another TV presenter).

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Famous Brazilian Pop-Singer “Roberto Carlos” at his end of the year special (Image Source: Internet Archives)

And what about the place you live? Are there any uncommon end of the year traditions? Tell me all about it!

10 Japanese Doramas You Must Watch

I’m totally a Japanese Dorama freak! Not that I dislike Korean Doramas, it’s just that since I can’t speak a single word in Korean and I can speak a bit of Japanese I kinda feel better watching the Japanese ones.

I’m always watching some Dorama series (way more than anime or other TV shows) and I made a list of the ones I found more interesting on the past few monthes that you certainly won’t regret seeing. Here it goes:

1 – Switch Girl and Switch Girl 2: Probably one of the cutest doramas I’ve ever watched and very loyal to the manga version. It’s about a girl with ON and OFF modes that can be switched according to the situation. With the amazing Mariya Nishiuchi, who is one of my favourite japanese actresses and co-starring Renn Kiriyama as her romantic partner Arata.

Mariya Nishiuchi as Tamya Nika from Switch Girl

Mariya Nishiuchi as Tamiya Nika from Switch Girl

2 – Detarame Hero: Meaning something like “random Hero”. It’s Funny and yet touching story about the transformation of a slob guy into a real hero after being putted in charge of his 8-year-old nephew and the acquisition of some “strange pills” that provide super powers to those who eat them. Starring Ryuta Sato as the protagonist Kenta.

3 – No Dropping Out: The story of a 35-year-old woman with a mysterious past that returns to finish high school and ends up changing the life of many people, including herself. Starring Ryoko Yonekura as the 35-years-old Baba Ayako.

4 – Death Note: It starts really bad but gets really awesome. It’s not very loyal to the manga or the anime story but it keeps it interesting. The fans opinions about it are very controversal, some of them love it and some of them hate it. So it’s the kinda of thing you really must watch to draw your own conclusions. Starring Kubota Masataka as Raito Yagami (his “Kira face” is pretty awesome), Kento Yamazaki as L and Hinako Sano as Misa Amane. I also wrote 2 reviews about it here and here if you want to learn more.

Raito Yagami and Ryukuu from Death Note

Raito Yagami (Masataka) and Ryukuu from Death Note

5 – Yamada-kun and the seven witches: Also based on a manga/anime, somewhat loyal to the original story. With Yusuke Yamamoto as Yamada Ryu and also starring Mariya Nishiuchi as the first witch Urara Shiraishi. As expect from the doramas she works, with lots of funny moments.

6 – Rebound: It criticizes japanese over skinny standards through the very funny story of a young woman who struggles with her weight to keep her job at a fashion magazine. Things got messy when she falls in love with a Pâtisserie chef. Starring Aibu Saki as Oba Nobuko.

7 – Wild Mom (Abarenbou Mama): Very touching but also very fun Dorama. It’s about a young woman who suddenly becomes her husband’s son “new mommy”. Starring Aya Ueto as Ayu.

8 – Itazura na Kiss (Misschievous kiss) – Love in Tokyo and Itazura na Kiss 2 – Love in Okinawa: It’s a very good adaptation of a manga series and probably one of the funniest dorama series I’ve watched lately.  It’s about a plain girl who falls in love with the most handsome and intelligent boy of her class (kind cliché, I know – but certainly worths watching). It’s nice to see how their relationship develops from nothing (or despise, maybe?) into real love. Starring Yuki Furukawa (I also adore him) as Irie Naoki and the cute Honoka Miki as Kotoko.

Honoka Miki as Kotoko from Itazura na Kiss

Honoka Miki as Kotoko from Itazura na Kiss

9 – Last Cinderella: About a middle age woman who lives a lonely life when suddenly a beard thread appears on her face. Her friends say it’s because she’s too manly. It kinda criticizes japanese patriarchal society as well. I really like one of its theme songs called “Last Love” by Rihwa.

Starring Ryoko Shinohara, co-starring Naohito Fujiki as Rintaro Tachibana and the ubberly cute Miura Haruma! ❤

Ryoko Shinohara as Toyama Tomoya from Last Cinderella

Ryoko Shinohara as Sakura Toyama from Last Cinderella

10 – Kokoro ga Pokitto ne: And at last but not least you definitely must watch Kokoro ga Pokitto ne. It’s a very emotional story about 4 very different people whose lives got completely entwined. With an amazing cast like:

Abe Sadao as Kojima Haruta (I didn’t know this actor before but he totally won my heart with this role)
Mizuhara Kiko as Hayama Miyako
Fujiki Naohito as Otake Shin (He also appears in Last Cinderella)
Yamaguchi Tomoko as Kamoda Shizuka
Tokunaga Eri as Itoyama Fumi
Yamashita Rio as Makino Eriko
Nagase Tasuku as Tomita Ryo
Ikezu Shoko as Shoji Kayoko

You should probably prepare your tissues, tears may come out :~


Most of these Doramas can be legally watched through Crunchyroll 😉

 

Review: Magnífica 70

Magnífica 70 is a brazilian TV series produced by HBO Latin America and directed by Claudio Torres. The first season has 13 episodes with 52 min duration each and (as expected from any HBO series) it’s visually amazing! Remarkable work of the cast aside – Costumes, scenarios, every single detail fits perfectly into São Paulo at the 70’s, where the story takes place. Although the plot may sound a bit plain at first, as the story goes on it really catches the interest of the viewer, not to mention all characters are deeply well-developed.

Magnífica 70 promo poster (source: Internet Archives)

Magnífica 70 promo poster (source: Internet Archives) – All rights reserved to HBO and associates

During military regime, Vicente (Marcos Winter) is a censorship agent with a boring life and a failed marriage. But everything changes when he censures a movie that leads him to meet Manolo (Adriano Garib) and Dora (Simone Spoladore) – a producer and an actress that work on that movie. As they try to convince Vicente to release their film, they introduce him to a world of magic and glory called cinema. And the censorship agent falls inexorably in love, initiating the old conflict between what’s desired and what’s forbidden.

Manolo, Dora and Vicente (Source: Internet Archives)

Manolo, Dora and Vicente (Source: Internet Archives) – All rights reserved to HBO and associates

Since Brazilian movies during the 70’s were mostly headed by a genre called “pornochanchada“, a mix between comedy and soft “adult content”, in order to make a faithful recriation of that time and place expect to see a considerable amount of graphic material. So I wouldn’t recommend this series for the ones who are under 18 (as mostly HBO series though). Nevertheless, Magnífica 70 is a series that’s going to get you amazed. Definitely worths watching!


PS: Season Two was already confirmed!

 

Brazilian addictions (I don’t have): “Novelas”

The greatest audience on brazilian non-paid TV surely belongs to the “Telenovelas” (or simply “novelas“). The “novelas” are something between an american TV series (expensive productions) and a mexican telenovela (daily aired but with a little less drama), usually presenting contemporary themes on brazilian quotidian life.

Some of the most popular brazilian “novelas” across the time. All rights belong to their respective owners.

Although they are more often enjoyed among lower social classes, they can get really popular even among the extremely rich people. However, that’s one of the (many) brazilian addictions I will probably never be into. It’s not that the production themselves are bad, sometimes the TV channels expend a huge amount of money on them by using distant locations, renown authors and famous actors. It’s just that for some reason I don’t seem to be able to relate to the characters nor the stories. And I don’t know why! 😦

Maybe I’m too much of an alien in my own country but I feel usually bored whenever I try to watch them. And since most people here either watch the current novelas or at least know a lot about what’s going on them, it can be really difficult to be like this. Not knowing a popular character or plot automatically puts you on the “weird people group”. Sometimes it can even be hard to sustain a conversation with others for more than a few seconds if you’re not familiar to the current “novelas” being aired. They dictate fashion, they are opinion formers and they generate many polemic and controversial topics (like a certain “gay kiss” showed on one of them) in Brazil.

Well, I did watched a few of them when I was younger: One called “O Clone” (The Clone), about a scientist who cloned some guy without his permit or knowledge and the love story between this guy, his clone and a muslim girl. Another one was “O Rei do Gado” (The King of Catle), about two rival italian families of farmers and “Renascer” (Reborn), about a poor guy who became a millionaire by becoming a Cocoa producer in Bahia. But all of those are from a time before cable TV. Maybe that’s the reason why I enjoyed them or maybe they were indeed very good stories.

You see, I’m really a “TV series person”. I’m a HBO series fan, I grew up with Buffy – The vampire slayer and I even watch Japanese dramas frequently. What’s the big difference between those series and the brazilian ones, then? Honestly I have no idea. All I know is that nowadays I simply can’t relate to brazilian “novelas” anymore. I could say maybe there’s a lack of good plots, but “good or bad plot” is totally a matter of point of view. Maybe the characters stopped being interesting (but then again, that’s a matter of point of view too) or maybe I’m just too different from common brazilian lifestyles. Got figure :/

“O Clone”, one of the few novelas I actually watched. It was a very good one though…

If you are planning to come to Brazil be prepared to hear a lot about the “novelas” and if you want to pose as a great Brazil aficionado make a good research about them (like the most popular channels are Rede Globo, SBT and Rede Record). That alone will certainly guarantee you long conversations with most brazilian people. 😀


EDIT: My sister (who’s a former English teacher) said “novelas” in English are soap operas. But I read about them and (although there are some similarities) they are not quite the same thing. Apparently brazilian “novelas” really are things that only exist here :~